The Scheduled Tribes and Other Traditional Forest Dwellers (Recognition of Forest Rights) Act, 2006

India’s colonial and post-colonial government systematically denied millions of tribal and forest-dwelling communities’ rights to their forest lands and resources. As a result of protracted grassroots struggle, the Scheduled Tribes, and Other Traditional Forest Dwellers (Recognition of Forest Rights) Act, 2006, also known as the Forests Rights Act (FRA), 2006 is a remarkable piece of legislation recognizing the individual and community rights of forest-dwelling and tribal communities. It sought to correct the ‘historic injustice’ faced by these communities integrating conservation and livelihoods. (more…)

Retrofitting Buildings in India: Balancing the Goals of Sustainability and Social Equity

Retrofitting is the process of making additions to or alterations of existing structures. In the context of buildings, retrofitting would involve making modifications to the existing building stock in an attempt to make it more energy-efficient, reduce its seismic vulnerability or adopt it as a component of hazard mitigation in general. It is important to note that buildings in India consume around 32% of the energy generated, contributing to around 22% of the annual GHG emissions. (more…)

India’s Tryst with Renewable Energy: The 3rd Global Re-Invest Meet & Expo

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented an unprecedented challenge to industrial and economic growth across the world. Even as industries begin to recover, as per some reports, businesses continue to operate at limited capacities with India seeing lower factory outputs and contraction of industrial production. This has resulted in trends that point towards a global recession. However, even amid such a contraction of economic growth both in India and worldwide, in its Renewables 2020 Report the International Energy Agency (IEA) has opined that the deployment and development of renewable energy (RE) have remained largely resistant and resilient to the conditions imposed by the pandemic- a trend that seems to be reflected in the Indian diaspora as well. There are predictions that even as there are short term falls in the installed capacity of distributed renewable energy, the industry itself will bounce back. This is in part helped by the short term relief provided to the power sector (which includes renewable energy) by the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) since late March, 2020.  (more…)

Summary Note: Symposium on Climate Change Mitigation Policies

Organised on: 29th November, 2020 

We, at LexQuest Foundation (LQF), organized the second edition of the Symposium on Public Policy, with the theme Climate Change Mitigation Policies, on the 29th of November 2020. Considering the pandemic and the limitations it has put on our mobility, the Symposium was held on a virtual platform. It aimed to reflect on aspects that are affected by climate change or have been an outcome of it. The Symposium comprised four sessions that facilitated the exchange of ideas and experiences of different speakers with the participants. The event was moderated by our Co-Founder & Executive Director, Tanya Chandra. (more…)

Policy Action to tackle Air Pollution in Delhi

Information about the Issue:

In a Supreme Court Judgement dated December 2, 2016 (M.C. Mehta v Union Of India), the Court directed the Environment Pollution Control Authority (EPCA) to prepare and implement a plan to eliminate the problem of excessive air pollution in Delhi-NCR. Thereafter, the Graded Response Action Plan (GRAP) was prepared and implemented by the EPCA, in collaboration with government experts, for different Air Quality Index (AQI) categories – Moderate & Poor, Very Poor and Severe. 

Despite the implementation of GRAP in NCR since 2017, the air quality in the city of Delhi has not improved to a great extent. The government of Delhi even had to declare a Public Health emergency in November 2019 when the Air Quality Index breached the 800 mark in some areas due to pollution from vehicles, factories, and firecrackers- the primary source being the burning of crop stubble across Punjab and Haryana. (more…)

The Potential Threat of Climate-Induced Migration: Coping Strategies & Mitigation Policies

India, a country already tormented by chronic poverty, developmental problems, and perils of overpopulation, is further burdened with acute climate migration internally as well as from neighboring countries. In the case of internal displacement, rural areas characterized by a loss of land productivity, and where conditions of drought and other cases of severe floods prevail, usually give rise to mass-migrations of people to urban areas in cities. For instance flooding in Uttarakhand and Sundarban region and droughts in States like Gujarat with majorly arid topography have led to migration towards the metropolitan cities of Delhi and Mumbai. According to data collected by the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre between 2008-16, 200 million people have been displaced worldwide and in India 1.5 million people are classified as internally displaced every year. (more…)

Symposium on Public Policy: Climate Change Mitigation

About the Event:

We are organizing our flagship public policy symposium online this year, on the theme of Climate Change Mitigation.

The Symposium aims to reflect on specific aspects of climate change that are either an outcome of or are deeply affected by it. The event agenda aims to highlight the potential of the success of climate change mitigation policies that will determine the economic, political and psycho-social policies of our societies, countries and the world as we know it. The sessions will focus on the need to better the present legislative framework and to fill the prevalent policy gaps at a municipal as well as global level in line with the demands of the ideal mitigation policies for climate change. (more…)